Navy helped to make Thailand cleaner

The cleaning team in Koh Chang district, Thailand, was really impressive. It consisted of the naval fleet and National Guard, plus 25 divers, cleaning underwater. Sixteen hotels sent their staff to participate in the cleanup day that also included people from seven villages. Altogether 400 people were taken to four islands in five wooden boats […]

The cleaning team in Koh Chang district, Thailand, was really impressive. It consisted of the naval fleet and National Guard, plus 25 divers, cleaning underwater. Sixteen hotels sent their staff to participate in the cleanup day that also included people from seven villages. Altogether 400 people were taken to four islands in five wooden boats and, amazingly, they managed to pick up 4755 kg of garbage.

But enough of numbers! Thomas Koch Teerasak Suamcheepmasau, the main contact from Thailand, said that the cleanup day was more than successful. “We got so lucky! The report predicted a storm, but the weather was really kind to us. It was not too sunny and there was no rain – a perfect day for working outside and making the world a better place!”

Thomas said that although they had been doing the underwater cleanup almost every year, the divers still found a lot of fishing equipment: nets, ropes, heavy bottles, etc. It is not a big surprise that 70 per cent of the found garbage was made of plastic, but fortunately 90 per cent of it can be recycled. As there is no established structure for recycling garbage in the region, the navy came to rescue during the World Cleanup Day and gathered all the collected garbage to take for recycling.

Thomas Koch Teerasak Suamcheepmasau is a member of a non-profit organisation Trash Hero Thailand which is organising cleanups and bottle programs throughout the year. The organisation provides hands-on experience with educational information about the impact that trash has on the global environment. They create long-term projects that bring communities together to remove and manage their waste, and strategies that reduce the amount of waste being produced in the future. Their aim is to motivate people to become Trash Heroes in their everyday lives.

Kertu Kärk